Sunday, May 31, 2009

More Need to Know

FOOD & NUTRITION: Depending on the conditions of your environment and level of activity, an individual can survive about three weeks without food. In extreme cold the lack of food can be dangerous, and in other situations, (like gradual dehydration), hunger can bring about many consequences long before it causes death. These problems can include irritability and low morale, weakness, loss of mental clarity, poor judgment, weakened immune system, and increased difficulty maintaining body temperature.

SANITATION & HYGIENE: During periods of emergency or disaster, sanitation levels can deteriorate rapidly and disease can spread and even cause death in a matter of days. Maintaining good hygiene will prevent disease and illness from spreading. You will need a way to use the bathroom, a way to keep your living environment clean, and a way to keep your hands, mouth, and body clean

Saturday, May 30, 2009

Some Basics

WARMTH & SHELTER: In extreme conditions, an individual will survive only about three hours without any protection from the elements. If you don’t have adequate shelter, you won’t have a chance to get thirsty or hungry before you start to suffer from hypothermia or extreme heat exposure. Shelter is anything that protects a person from his environment (including dangerous cold and heat) and allows restful sleep. It’s recommended to always keep up-to-date clothes and a compact tent in your 72-hr-kit.

WATER & HYDRATION: According to the Red Cross, your body can only survive three days without access to water in extreme conditions. This is assuming you’re at sea level, room temperature, with relatively favorable humidity. In colder or warmer temperatures, the need for water is greater. (Need for water also increases with exertion.) A lack of water causes dehydration, which may result in lethargy, headaches, dizziness, confusion, and eventually death. Even mild dehydration reduces endurance and impairs concentration, which is dangerous in a survival situation where clear thinking is essential. We recommend that you have at least 3 different ways to access water. Large barrels, 50 gallons or greater, can store a large amount of water, but are obviously not portable since fully loaded they can weigh over 400 lbs. You need portable water containers in case you need to evacuate your house, like the 5 gallon stackable water containers. You also need a way to purify water if you have access to a supply, but it is unsafe to drink.

Monday, May 11, 2009

Survival Gardening


When gardening in a survival situation there are many things to consider. First you must put in a garden big enough to have fresh vegetables in the fall and be able to can enough to last you till the next harvest so you will have food all year. Now another thing you must consider is to be sure to grow enough so you can save seeds for the next season. Remember when you harvest vegetables to eat in the fall most seeds are not fully developed so you must leave them on the vine until they are fully ripe or with beans you leave them on the vine until they are dry. Be sure and store your seeds in a cool dry place for the winter. Store as many seeds as you can, if they are stored properly they will last for a couple of years. And always having backup seeds is needed in survival situations.

Ron

Wednesday, May 6, 2009

In case of an Emergency

Surviving any Emergency is a task that can wear down a person’s ability to properly take care of themselves and their families. Having the ability to adjust and adapt is a skill that must be taught and is somewhat in our nature. Part of surviving is being able to read people and tell what their real intentions are. If you are around a person for a small amount of time certain personality traits will come out and you must be aware of these subtle changes in a person’s personality because these are warning signs that this person has another agenda.

Surviving has many aspects to it and I believe this is one of the most important lessons you should learn. My Grandfather used to tell of a story of the Scorpion and the Dog, I have heard several different versions of it , but this is how he told it.

A wandering dog came upon a swift stream where stood a scorpion that wanted to cross. The scorpion asked the dog if he would swim across the stream with the scorpion on his back.

But you will sting me, Replied the dog.

No I won’t, said the scorpion. If I did I would drown!

OK, replied the good natured dog. Crawl up on my back and I will take you across to the other side.

So the scorpion crawls up onto the dogs back and the dog starts to swim to the other side. When about halfway across the scorpion stings the dog and the dog asks?

Why did you do that? Now you are going to drown. The dog asks as he is dying?

Hey, I’m a scorpion, it’s my nature.

So in case of an emergency, don't trust anyone except family members and well known friends.

Sunday, May 3, 2009

Starting Seeds

If you are starting your garden from seed, you may want to start your seeds indoors. Indoor seed starts have a higher success rate initially, this is very important if you are working from seed you gathered yourself! Plant seeds in an area with good lighting (grow light work really well) and be sure not to over-water. Keep the soil at room temperature. Once sprouts have grown two true leaves in addition to their cotyledons (sprouting leaves), transfer them into larger, biodegradable containers and space them two to three inches apart.

Organic gardening is not a fad or new in any way. Rather, organic gardening is the oldest, cheapest and most practical means of growing vegetables that exists. Organic vegetables are tastier, prettier and healthier than their non-organic counterparts. Organic gardening benefits not only you and your family, but your land, animals and the earth. And you will find with fertile soil and healthy plants that insect herbivore will actually decrease.

Saturday, May 2, 2009

Vegetable Gardening


Vegetables
As you're planting your vegetable garden, consider planting times as well as plant compatibility.

In most climates it's safe now to seed or plant hardier vegetables such as beans, peas, potatoes, lettuce, carrots, corn and chard.

When you're sure the soil is thoroughly thawed and warm (at least 60 degrees), go ahead and sow cucumbers, squash, melons, peppers, tomatoes and other tender annuals.

Plant celery and cucumbers near your bean starts — they make good neighbors!

Beans also get along well with peas, corn and potatoes, but keep them away from "aromatic" vegetables such as leeks, garlic, onions and shallots.

Carrots, tomatoes and lettuces also like each other's company — just be sure not to mix them with dill.

Seeds of corn, pumpkins, squash, beans and melons can be sown directly into the ground now.

If you sow vine crops for later transplant, use peat pots. At planting time, bury the whole pot so fragile roots don't become damaged.